The Flavourium
The Flavourium
CBD | VAPE | TREATS

CBD | VAPE | TREATS

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An Experience

Come experience all the benefits of our products. We offer high end products of CBD, Vape and Edibles. The Flavourium is the areas first vapor boutique and we pride ourselves on service, products and professionalism. Please respect our 18+ to enter policy with absolutely NO exceptions.

VAPE

Many brands of liquid available, we have a huge selection with hundreds of bottles in stock plus all of your hardware needs, from beginner to advanced.

We all know what a cigarette is – a paper tube filled with shredded tobacco, usually with a filter at one end – but many people don’t understand exactly what it is that vapers (e-cigarette users) are inhaling from. That has led to a lot of confusion, as many people hear the word “cigarette” and assume an e-cigarette is a high-tech version of a traditional tobacco product. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth.

Electronic cigarettes were designed as a replacement for cigarettes. They have the same purpose – to deliver inhaled nicotine – but do it in a completely different way. Some, in fact, CONTAIN ZERO NICOTINE.

How do they work?

Cigarettes work by burning tobacco leaves. The inhalation of the resulting smoke delivers nicotine to the user, but also 4,000-plus chemicals, including the toxic amalgamation of chemicals known as tar and other chemicals at dangerous levels.

In contrast, electronic cigarettes–otherwise known as vaping products—don’t contain tobacco and don’t involve the burning of any substance. Instead, e-cigarette products are filled with a liquid that often, but not always, contains nicotine. A small heating element inside the device turns the liquid into a vapor that is then inhaled through a mouthpiece. There’s no combustion, so there’s no smoke.

At the heart of any vapor product is the atomizer. This contains the coil which heats up in order to vaporize the liquid, but it needs other parts too. Almost all atomizers have a storage tank for liquid. There’s also a wick to carry liquid from the tank to the coil. There’s an air intake system that lets air flow into the atomizer, over the coil and up to the mouthpiece, carrying the vapor with it. Finally, there’s the mouthpiece (or tip) itself.

To supply the device with power, the atomizer is connected to a battery. Usually it screws into the top of the battery housing, but some models are one-piece units that contain both. Studies show that established vapers, particularly those who have switched from smoking to vaping, tend to use more advanced products with removable atomizers, in part because this allows users to more easily switch among different flavors throughout their day.

Many e-cigarettes have fixed batteries built in to the device body. The body will also contain the connector for the atomizer, the fire button (which activates the coil) and a charging port. It might also have extra controls to adjust how much power is sent to the coil. Usually there is an LED screen to help adjust settings and show remaining battery life.

There are also devices with removable batteries available. The big advantage of these is that if the battery runs low the device doesn’t have to be plugged in to charge; you can just replace the batteries and recharge the flat ones in an external charger. These devices are usually called mods, and most of them have a full range of features including power and temperature control.

The last component of an e-cigarette is the liquid it vaporizes. There are a lot of inaccurate beliefs about this liquid. Many people believe it’s an oil, or that it contains tobacco. They think the liquid comes from China and is potentially contaminated.

In fact, the liquid is mostly propylene glycol and vegetable glycerin, both of which are commonly used in food and FDA-approved medicines. The last time you went to a concert and a fog machine was used, the ‘fog’ was likely produced using propylene glycol. Most liquid also contains pharmaceutical grade nicotine; almost all liquids have food-grade flavoring added. And while Chinese companies do produce e-liquid, the majority of what’s for sale in the USA is domestically produced, usually to very high standards. ALL LIQUIDS SOLD AT THE FLAVOURIUM ARE PRODUCED IN THE USA.

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WHAT IS CBD?

1.) CBD is a Main Component of Cannabis

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a primary component of cannabis. It is one of more than 85 compounds unique to the plant and grouped under the umbrella term cannabinoids. CBD and THC are the most prominent cannabinoids found in cannabis, and as such have undergone the heaviest scientific study.

2.) CBD Oil Won’t Get You High

CBD does not cause the feeling of being ‘high’ that is often associated with cannabis. The high is caused by THC. THC binds tightly to the CB1 and CB2 nerve receptors in the brain and throughout the body. CBD does not bind to these receptors and instead causes its therapeutic actions through more indirect means.

Because CBD will not make you feel intoxicated, it is a great option for parents, workers, and anyone else who does not to compromise their mental clarity.

Many health conditions, both severe and not, are treated with pharmaceutical drugs. Unfortunately, many of these drugs have unpleasant or dangerous side effects. In some instances, CBD may offer non-toxic, virtually side-effect free, natural benefits for individuals who want to avoid or reduce the number of pharmaceuticals they are taking.

3.) CBD Oil from Hemp is Legal

CBD products come either from medical cannabis or industrial hemp plants. While still illegal under federal law, cannabis is legal in several states. And because it has a low THC content (>.3%), industrial hemp does not fall under these same regulations. This means that consumers are free to choose CBD as a natural supplement without worrying about any legal repercussions.

4.) The Human Body Produces Cannabinoids, and CBD Oil Helps

Phytocannabinoids are cannabinoids derived from plants. Endocannabinoids are cannabinoids produced naturally in the human body.

One example of an endocannabinoid is anandamide, or ‘the bliss molecule.’ This molecule activates the CB1 receptor.

Benefits of activating the CB1 receptor include:

Relieving depression [S]

Increasing myelin formation [S]

Lowering intestinal inflammation [S]

Decreasing intestinal permeability (Leaky Gut Syndrome) [S]

Lowering blood pressure [S]

Lowering anxiety [S]

Reducing fear and paranoia [S]

Increasing BDNF levels [S]

Increasing PPARy expression [S]

Reducing GPR55 signaling [S]

Lowering prolactin [S]

An enzyme in the body known as FAAH is responsible for breaking down anandamide. CBD is an inhibitor of FAAH, meaning more anandamide to be available to the CB1 receptors.

Anandamide has been shown to stop the proliferation of breast cancer cells, promote anti-anxiety and antidepressant effects, and increases neurogenesis. Anandamide plays a role in memory and forgetting, creating a potential natural value for individuals with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

5.) CBD Oil Effects Several Neurotransmitter Receptors

CBD is an allosteric modulator at several receptor sites in our bodies.

Allosteric modulators change the shape of specific receptors to alter their ability to interact with neurotransmitters.

CBD is a positive allosteric modulator of the mu and delta opioid receptors. This means it enhances the ability of these receptors to receive endogenous enkephalins which can increase quality of life and naturally reduce pain.  

Inversely, CBD is a negative allosteric modulator of the CB1 receptor, reducing its ability to bind with THC; this explains why high-CBD cultivars of cannabis mitigate many of the unwanted side effects associated with THC. [S], [S]

At high doses, CBD activates the 5-ht1A receptor. The 5-ht1A receptor helps regulate anxiety, addiction, appetite, sleep, pain perception, nausea, and vomiting. CBDA (the raw form of CBD) shows an even higher affinity for the 5-ht1A receptor than CBD. [S]

CBD also antagonizes GPR55 receptors. GPR55 receptors are widely distributed in the brain (especially the cerebellum) and help to control bone density and blood pressure.

When activated, GPR55 promotes cancer cell proliferation. This antagonizing action may help explain the natural value of supplementing with CBD in individuals with cancer, osteoporosis, and high blood pressure. [S]

CBD activates TRPV1 receptors. TRPV1 is involved in regulating pain, body temperature, and inflammation. Other substances targeting TRPV1 receptors include anandamide, AM404 (a metabolite of acetaminophen), capsaicin, and various cannabinoids such as CBN, CBG, CBC, THCV, and CBDV.

Lastly, CBD activates PPAR-gamma receptors. PPAR-gamma receptors are located on the cell’s nuclei and play a role in lipid uptake, insulin sensitivity, dopamine release and the degradation of beta-amyloid plaque. This is why CBD has been found to have natural value for individuals with diabetes, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s disease.  [S]

6.) CBD Oil May Help with Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency (CECD)

Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency is a condition where an individual has a lower amount of endogenous cannabinoids than is considered necessary to promote health and well-being.

Scientists now believe CECD may play a role in the following conditions:

Fibromyalgia

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Migraines

Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Neuropathy

Huntington’s

Parkinson’s

Motion Sickness

Autism

Many of these conditions are treated with a range of medications that carry some heavy side effects. As the research develops, if CECD is found to be the culprit behind these conditions, CBD would help increase endocannabinoids in the body without many of the risks associated with pharmaceuticals.

7.) CBD Oil Has Numerous Natural Benefits

Cannabidiol is one of 85+ cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant, and much of the ongoing research has found it to be a promising potential therapy for many illnesses that medical professionals have previously thought to be untreatable, including:

Pain (neuropathic, chronic, cancer-related, etc.)

Epilepsy

Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

Parkinson’s

Inflammation

Acne

Dyskinesia

Psoriasis

Broken Bones

Mad Cow Disease

Depression

Bacterial Infections

Diabetes

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Nausea

Anxiety

ADHD

Schizophrenia

Substance Abuse/Withdrawal

Heart Disease

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

 
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